In press


Evidence of thalattosuchian crocodylomorphs in the Portland Stone Formation (Late Jurassic) of England, and a discussion on Cretaceous teleosauroids

 Young, M. & Sachs, S. (in press) Evidence of thalattosuchian crocodylomorphs in the Portland Stone Formation (Late Jurassic) of England, and a discussion on Cretaceous teleosauroids, Historical Biology. [Request a pdf]

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We report the first definite specimen of a thalattosuchian crocodylomorph from the Portland Stone Formation of England. This specimen (an isolated tooth crown) can be referred to the teleosauroid genus Machimosaurus based on its conical shape, distinctive enamel ornamentation and lack of carinae. Understanding the faunal composition of the Portland Stone Formation is key to elucidating the distinct shift in crocodylomorph taxa that occurred during the Tithonian-to-Berriasian in Europe. One of the most striking aspects of this faunal shift is the hypothesised extinction of Teleosauroidea in Europe. The presence of Machimosaurus in the Portland Stone Formation supports the hypothesis that the localised marine regression in Europe at the Jurassic–Cretaceous boundary, and the resultant habitat loss, contributed to the absence of teleosauroids in Europe during the Berriasian. However, the fossil record of thalattosuchians during the Cretaceous is notorious scarce. We review the purported Cretaceous record of teleosauroids, and agree that closer to the equator this clade survived for at least 20 million years after the Jurassic–Cretaceous boundary.

2020


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First record of Gyrosteus mirabilis (Actinopterygii, Chondrosteidae) from the Toarcian (Lower Jurassic) of the Baltic region
Hornung, J. & Sachs, S. (2020) First record of Gyrosteus mirabilis (Actinopterygii, Chondrosteidae) from the Toarcian (Lower Jurassic) of the Baltic region. PeerJ 8:e8400.
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An isolated hyomandibula from a lower Toarcian carbonate concretion of the Ahrensburg erratics assemblage (Schleswig-Holstein, northern Germany) represents the first record of a chondrosteid fish from the Lower Jurassic of the southwestern Baltic realm. Except for its smaller size, the specimen is morphologically indistinguishable from corresponding elements of Gyrosteus mirabilis from the Toarcian of Yorkshire, England. This find, which probably originates from the western Baltic basin between Bornholm Island (Denmark) and northeastern Germany, markedly expands the known range of this chondrosteid taxon across the northern part of the strait connecting the Boreal Sea with the Tethys Ocean during the Early Jurassic. For the first time the extension of the paleogeographic range of a chondrosteid species beyond it
Hornung & Sachs (2020) First record of G
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